Duck Vindaloo

Duck VindalooGOA-an Somewhere?
In December of 1999, when my husband and I were just engaged, we were invited by a dear friend to stay with him and his family in Mumbai, India. The plan was to be in Mumbai to soak in all that the city has to offer before heading down to Goa to ring in the new century at a resort on the beach. This would be my first time traveling outside of the United States. And, if the Adventures of Alice in Wonderland comes to mind, you wouldn’t be wrong.

My husband has traveled all over the world. The only continent he has yet to explore is Australia. He’s lived in Mexico and Canada, gone on safari in Tanzania, explored much of Europe, and traveled through South America and parts of the Middle East—to name just a few destinations.

Back then he was only a few years removed from a stint in the Peace Corps. I was definitely a fish out of water. But, I was curious and fascinated by India, the food, the people, and the customs. (Don’t get me wrong it was a shock to the system. Nothing can prepare you for the sheer number of people, among other things.)

The markets were an explosion of color. I went with our friend’s mother and grandmother one day to pick out a sari and it was one of the greatest experiences of my life. (Getting it to fit correctly was a challenge. At 5”10”, I couldn’t buy off the rack. Alas, after 3 kids, it no longer fits…) We ate spicy curry every morning for breakfast and drank the best chai you ever tasted. (It was rough on my Western stomach, but it was sooo good.) But the tandoori crab we ate one night…OMG. We still talk about it in hushed and reverent tones…

Goa was a totally different experience. It has a much more Mediterranean feel, and, because of Goa’s Portuguese history, you see things there that you would not see anywhere else in the country. The architecture is different. The lifestyle is different. It is a much slower pace. Most people live in villages versus the city. Goa is a haven for the Bohemian and creative-minded and artists from all over come here to live.

Lastly, Goan food is different. As you would expect of an area on the coast, the diet of Goa relies heavily on fish and seafood. But, it is not uncommon to find pork and beef on the menu thanks to its Portuguese Catholic roots. And you will always find something spicy. The Portuguese are responsible for bringing chilis over from Brazil and introducing them to the rest of India. So, it should come as no surprise that Vindaloo, or Vindahlo, the spicy curry found on the menu of numerous Indian restaurants, comes from Goa. Shrimp is everywhere in Goa, and I am always down for a spicy shrimp vindaloo. Paired with steamed Jasmin rice it’s a great way to warm yourself up on a cold winter day.

I was intrigued, however, when I saw this recipe for Duck Vindaloo. I can count on one hand the number of duck recipes I have come across while looking for Indian food. I see it more with Thai or Indonesian food. This dish can be served with rice in true Indian fashion. And, for a more Portuguese/Goan feel, serve it with some boiled potatoes and your favorite sautéed winter greens.

Duck Vindaloo Recipe
Adapted from Madhur Jaffrey’s Ultimate Curry Bible
Yields 6 servings Read more…

Drunken Clams and Noodles

Drunken Clams and Noodles Cooking In The Time Of Covid
We interrupt our January journey through the wonderful world of curry to bring you a special event called Cooking in the time of Covid. My kids went back to school last Wednesday. By Saturday, my boys tested positive. They have been isolated in the room they share ever since. Thankfully, the rest of the family has remained covid-free. Though, meals have been difficult to manage.

The boys’ main complaint has been a very sore throat (like a bad case of strep—if you’ve ever had it). Since swallowing things is painful, I’ve been making dishes that are soft, easier to swallow, and kid-friendly. Basically, my 17-year-olds have reverted to the age of 8. It’s been a lot of pasta, to be honest. I made Mac n Cheese the other night from scratch. Never from a box. There are lines I just won’t cross.

And, last night I made some really tasty ramen.

My whole family went on a ramen kick over the holidays to the point that we were having some form of ramen every couple of days. Not sure what started it, but I now have every possible ingredient you could need to make it.

I found this recipe for Drunken Clams and Noodles in the current issue of Bon Appetite. It was a big hit—though be aware of the Thai chilis ‘cause it was spicy. I used the amount listed. But, I must have picked a super-hot chili. Luckily, it wasn’t so hot that it was inedible…unless you ask my daughter who doesn’t like heat. My husband said it was spot-on but he likes it when his eyelids sweat. The boys are just hoping the spicy hot broth will burn the virus from their bodies.

Drunken Clams and Noodles Recipe
Adapted from Bon Appetit February 2022
Yields 4 servings Read more…

South Indian Mixed Vegetable Curry

South Indian Mixed Vegetable CurrySpice it Up
There is always a bit of a letdown after the holidays. After weeks of planning and food and get-togethers, all the excitement and frenetic energy are just gone. It’s sitting out beside your driveway with the Christmas tree. (Wow, aren’t I a ray of sunshine?) I have mentioned in the past that in January my food choices tend to skew towards the super spicy. And, I think this post-holiday void is at least part of the reason.

Curries have been on my mind—if only because they are a great way to combine the healthy eating we all seem to take a stab at in the beginning of the new year with the much-needed oompf of aromatics and heat. While the aspirations of leading a vegetable-forward, healthy clean life may fade as we head into February, exploring the world of curry can take you into next month and beyond because there are so many possibilities.

When most people think of curry they immediately think of India, but curries are found in a wide range of countries and cultures thanks to centuries of commerce practiced along trade routes like the Silk Road and the Curry Trail. Today you will find delicious curries not only in India but in Africa and South America as well as Indonesia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Japan, and so many more countries.

Our recipe for South Indian Mixed Vegetable Curry is a simple one. Some of the ingredients can be hard to find (especially in the current trade climate). So, I have listed their substitutes as well…

South Indian Mixed Vegetable Curry Recipe
Adapted from Madhur Jaffrey’s Ultimate Curry Bible
Yields 4 servings Read more…

Stuffed Cinderella Pumpkin

Stuffed Cinderella PumpkinOther
What’s the first thing you think of when you hear the word Thanksgiving? If I had to guess, most people would say a turkey (followed very quickly by pie). It would make sense. Thanksgiving is the one holiday where everyone eats the same stuff…right?

Yes, turkey is what’s expected for your Thanksgiving feast. But, what if you don’t like turkey? I have a number of friends who are not fans of the majestic bird—either because of the flavor or the fact that it can dry out and feel like you’re eating sawdust. Plenty more can’t fit one in their oven. Most of those people choose to go with something different like a beautiful prime rib or a spiral cut ham. Either of these will please a crowd and screams of celebration.

That being said, presentation is everything. There is something about the drama of bringing a turkey or other roast to the table to carve that reminds you that this is not your typical Thursday dinner. I have thought about this a lot and I have always felt disappointment on behalf of vegetarians that they don’t always get to feel that excitement. Now, not being a vegetarian myself, I could be totally off the mark here. And, there are any number of ways to make an entrance with a vegetarian entrée. I would love to hear what those options might be.

In the meantime, I think this recipe for a Stuffed Cinderella Pumpkin would fit that bill and make a fantastic entrance while still having all the drama and ceremony of a traditional carving.

If you have seen the cover of the November issue of Food & Wine you know what I am talking about. This Greens and Cheese Stuffed Pumpkin is gorgeous and would even work well as a fantastic side if you use a smaller pumpkin….

Stuffed Cinderella Pumpkin
Adapted from Anna Theoktisto for Food and Wine Magazine
Yields 8 Servings Read more…